Cumulus Gets That Sinking Feeling On Wall Street

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Cumulus Media could be on the verge of getting the boot from Nasdaq, unless it considers another reverse stock split.


The No. 2 radio company by number of AMs and FMs, Cumulus shares dipped 5.7% in mid-week trading on Wall Street, on heavier than average volume of 326,268 shares.

The fall, to 33 cents, puts CMLS shares at their lowest price since mid-May, signaling shakiness among stockholders ahead of the company’s Q3 finish on Friday.

Cumulus’ market cap presently stands at $9.67 million; its one-year target estimate is 63 cents.

Cumulus Media in late March received a de-listing notice from Nasdaq for failing to have its stock close at a minimum $1 per share for more than month. It initially had until May 5 to comply, and then received a 180-day extension.

With today’s big dip on Wall Street for CMLS shares, options are thin for Cumulus.

Nasdaq’s compliance deadline comes following a 1-for-8 reverse stock split conducted in mid-October 2016, designed to further avoid any further delisting concerns.

Had the reverse stock split not taken place, Cumulus shares would presently be valued at approximately 4 cents each.

If Cumulus were to engage in another reverse stock split, at minimum it would be a 1-for-3 arrangement, based on its present stock value.

A previous warning from Nasdaq regarding a possible delisting came in November 2015.

In other Wall Street Report activity, found at the homepage of RBR.com:

  • Veritone Inc. shareholders made a quick profit from yesterday’s historic close by selling off shares, sending the AI tech firm’s stock down 30.3%, to $45.95. Still, VERI was at $7.87 in late August.
  • Beasley Broadcasting Group shares improved 4.3%, to $12.20.

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Adam R Jacobson is a veteran radio industry journalist and advertising industry analyst with general, multicultural and Hispanic market expertise. From 1996 to 2006 he served as an editor at Radio & Records.