Nielsen’s Q3 Report: All About The Moms

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The third quarter 2016 edition of Nielsen‘s Total Audience Report was released Tuesday morning (1/3), and the focus of this latest look at media consumption among U.S. audiences puts a magnifying glass on moms.


As Nielsen SVP/Audience Insights Glenn Enoch notes, there are 25.1 million women aged 18-49 living in their own home who have children under the age of 12. With that established, Nielsen divided the women into two groups: working moms, and stay-at-home mothers.

Income, education, home status, urbanicity and race/origin are examined, while Nielsen also provides data on their technology ownership and media behavior across TV, radio and digital media.

Among the key findings:

  • working moms spend more time listening to radio
  • stay-at-home moms spend more time with the TV screen (both live TV and OTT devices)
  • among those who use digital devices, stay-at-home moms spend more time with PCs, smartphones, and tablets

Meanwhile, an overall look at total consumers shows radio as the No. 2 platform among persons aged 18-49 in terms of time spent — ahead of smartphones and behind TV.


RBR + TVBR OBSERVATION (full text below, for subscribers only): Here’s another example of how radio companies need to join together, with the NAB and RAB, and pitch in for a campaign that touts the relevance, importance, and reverence of AM and FM radio. It’s time to spend money on a truly captivating campaign that goes beyond using radio to promote radio. This means cool advertising as YouTube pre-roll, on DVR, on top digital platforms, and on Snapchat, where teens and fun adults can make goofy pics with a radio station logo or something tied to radio. All of this should then be put into a PowerPoint and distributed to every media buyer and CMO in the U.S. ahead of a presentation at the ANA Masters of Marketing conference.


More About Moms

Nielsen’s look into working moms — a key for the radio industry — shows the following:

  • The percentage of working moms increases with age. Some 71% of moms 18-34 are working, compared to 77% of moms aged 35-49. Still, with more than 7 in 10 moms in the workplace, radio could use this intelligence to attract pharmaceutical dollars, and national dollars from CPG companies with products of interest to this segment of adult women. Does your radio station overindex with females in this age group? Then, your radio station could be a great home for cost-effective, high-impact advertising from Procter & Gamble Co. Walmart could develop specifically tailored advertising touting its wide assortment of products for moms with children ranging from newborns to high school seniors. Supermarket chains, automotive brands and clothing retails could also strongly benefit from increased use of radio based on this high level of radio usage among working moms.
  • Moms with more children are less likely to be working. Moms with older children are more likely to be working.
  • Moms who are not in the workforce are more likely to be Asian American or Hispanic – with a larger percentage of Hispanic Spanish Dominant (14%) than other groups of Latinas.
  • Working moms are mostly homeowners who live in single-family dwellings primarily in suburban areas or smaller towns and rural areas.

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For the television industry, one of the biggest takeaways from the latest Nielsen Total Audience Report is that moms, regardless of working status, spend the most time with DVRs and Multimedia Devices across TV-connected devices. Thus, live TV is decreasing in importance, while viewing of these shows remains a vital part of the mom’s entertainment choices.

Radio’s In-Home Struggles

For stay-at-home mothers, radio use is significantly less than working moms. This is in line with the overall use of radio outside of home — in the car for traffic and information, along with entertainment and music; and at the office. Radio may wish to promote itself as an “everywhere about the home” medium to moms; the NextRadio app for Android users could capitalize on this opportunity with a “connected to your community, as you connect with your kids” campaign.

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Do working moms have different radio listening preferences than stay-at-home mothers? Yes, says Nielsen.

Adult Contemporary and Hot Adult Contemporary radio stations are much more likely to be consumed by working moms (9.7% and 9.4%, respectively) than among stay-at-home mothers (6.9% and 7.5%, respectively).

This suggests that CPG companies, automotive brands, supermarkets and big-box retailers have a large opportunity to reach this audience through advertising, marketing and promotional campaigns on AC and Hot AC stations. As research conducted in recent years by Mintel, IRI and Nielsen suggests, moms still make much of the buying decisions in the family — in particular in Hispanic households. Use of radio stations with formats of preferences to working moms could provide additional ROI to brands that use the medium to promote their products and services.

On the flip side, brand managers and CMOs with products and services of heightened appeal to stay-at-home mothers may wish to engage in underwriting opportunities with Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) stations. Some 6.7% of all stay-at-home mothers consume radio stations in this format, compared to 5.5% of working mothers.

THE BIG PICTURE: LIVE TV TIME SPENT SLIPS, RADIO SOLID

Based on the total U.S. population, live TV consumption has dipped to an average four hours, six minutes per person in the U.S., Nielsen’s Q3 2016 Total Audience Report shows. This is down by one minute (4:07) in Q3 2015, but down from four hours, 13 minutes in Q3 2014.

At the same time, DVR/time-shifted TV is up by one minute from Q3 2015, to 29 minutes.

What has surged since Q3 2014 is DVD/Blu-Ray device usage, from 47 minutes two years ago to 51 minutes in Q3 2015, to 57 minutes in Q3 2016.

Then, there is App/Web use on a smartphone. It’s more than surged — it’s exploding and has overtaken radio use.

While AM/FM radio consumption is back up to 1 hour and 52 minutes (where it was in Q3 2014), from 1 hour and 50 minutes last year, App/Web use on a smartphone among the total U.S. population has catapulted itself to 2 hours and 10 minutes. This compares to 1 hour 14 minutes in Q3 2015, and 58 minutes in Q3 2014.

When looking solely at users of each medium, the evolving media habits of U.S. consumers is even more clear:

nielsen-q3-tar3As shown at left, radio consumption is not eroding, while live+DVR and time-shifted TV is more impacted by new technologies involving other visual entertainment options.

This shows that radio and audio are strong accompaniments to digital platforms. The radio industry could benefit from tandem sales and marketing initiatives, allowing for maximum 360-degree consumer reach at costs that are not as prohibitive as that of the television industry.

 


RBR + TVBR OBSERVATION: Here’s another example of how radio companies need to join together, with the NAB and RAB, and pitch in for a campaign that touts the relevance, importance, and reverence of AM and FM radio. It’s time to spend money on a truly captivating campaign that goes beyond using radio to promote radio. This means cool advertising as YouTube pre-roll, on DVR, on top digital platforms, and on Snapchat, where teens and fun adults can make goofy pics with a radio station logo or something tied to radio. All of this should then be put into a PowerPoint and distributed to every media buyer and CMO in the U.S. ahead of a presentation at the ANA Masters of Marketing conference. It is our belief that the broadcast television industry is at one of its most pivotal and, potentially most devastating, turning points in its history. As ATSC 3.0 and UHD 4k technology is promoted as the biggest thing since the advent of color television by some, data suggest that the digital revolution will reshape the concept of a broadcast and/or cable station even further in the coming years — or, perhaps months. With retransmission disputes getting ugly in multiple corners of the Lower 48, will viewers simply cut the cord and get a good-ol’ fashion antenna? If they’re older, perhaps. Younger listeners may just say “to heck with you” and stick to their Netflix, Amazon Video, Hulu and other OTT offerings. As technology improves, reports of issues with DirecTV Now will fade. But, will subscriber growth at a cable company fade? Will companies like Hearst and Sinclair, in disputes with DirecTV, face increased pressure from networks who are the unfortunate losers in these battles? What’s to stop NBC from going directly to a cable TV or DBS service provider and killing the entire concept of an “affiliate,” come 2028? Meanwhile, “AM and FM” have a brighter future and steady consumer base, as this data show. We don’t wish to be the harbinger of doom for the broadcast TV industry, but we like radio’s current health. Our only issue we have is with the CMOs and brand managers that continue to fail at understanding the power of audio. We’re here to help solve this crisis.