On the job with your younger television audience

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People watching TVAn important insight into the nature of your audience is knowledge of how much money they make, and how they make it. Thanks to the research experts at Prosper Research and Analytics, we can tell you that and more. Today, we look at the younger half of the TV audience.


In addition to information about income, we have a window into the number of students, the number of unemployed, the number of homemakers, and even the number of disabled for 16 radio and 18 television audiences.

This information can instruct your choice of conversation topics, and perhaps help drum up on-the-job listening. It may also suggest what types of advertisers would be good fits for your audience.

For example, in the educational category, advanced business courses might match up well with the Home Improvement audience, which boasts an audience with 35.5% in the professional/managerial job sector.

On the other hand, one of three program types with unemployment ratings of 10.5% or higher might match well with companies selling basic job skills training.

This is the second installment of four. Today we’ll be looking television, and particularly at the audiences for Cartoons, Music Videos, Wrestling, Reality TV, Movies, Sitcoms, Cooking Shows, Documentaries and Sports.

Our thanks to Prosper Insights and Analytics for access to their excellent and comprehensive database. More information about PI&A can be found here

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18+
Here’s the benchmark against which each audience can be compared. About 9% of the population is dispersed through numerous occupational categories that do not easily fit into any of these generalities.
48.5%: Male
51.5%: Female
45.5: Age
$63,280: Income
28.0%: Professional/Managerial (1)
17.1%: Retired (2)
10.8%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
7.4%: Student, High School or College (4)
6.5%: Unemployed 5)
4.9%: Business Owner (6)
4.3%: Homemaker (7)
3.9%: Salesperson (8) 3.7%: Disabled (9)
3.6%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
0.8%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Cartoons
The youngest TV audience is loaded with students and largely free of retired people. It’s on the low end of the income spectrum and has a high unemployment factor. It skews very high for salespeople.
58.2%: Male
41.8%: Female
33.9: Age
$53,474: Income
22.5%: Professional/Managerial (1)
13.9%: Student, High School or College (4)
10.6%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
10.5%: Unemployed 5)
6.4%: Homemaker (7)
5.9%: Salesperson (8)
5.5%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
4.9%: Business Owner (6)
4.2%: Disabled (9) 3.0%: Retired (2)
1.7%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Music Videos
This is the only TV audience except Cartoons to deliver students in double-digit numbers. It’s second-to-last in terms of income, with a high percentage of both blue collar and unemployed people. It’s another big category for salespeople.
54.0%: Male
46.0%: Female
36.1: Age
$51,393: Income
22.4%: Professional/Managerial (1)
11.6%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
11.5%: Student, High School or College (4)
10.5%: Unemployed 5)
6.4%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
6.0%: Salesperson (8)
5.0%: Homemaker (7)
5.0%: Disabled (9)
4.7%: Retired (2)
4.6%: Business Owner (6)
1.4%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Wrestling
One of TV’s smaller audiences, it’s also the poorest and hampered with the highest unemployment rate. For the age level, the number of students is low and the number of disable people is very high. It also skews high for blue collar workers and members of the military.
79.7%: Male
20.3%: Female
38.7: Age
$49,809: Income
19.0%: Professional/Managerial (1)
13.2%: Unemployed 5) 9.6%: Retired (2)
8.6%: Disabled (9)
8.0%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
7.3%: Student, High School or College (4)
7.0%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
6.2%: Business Owner (6) 6.2%: Salesperson (8)
3.5%: Homemaker (7)
1.9%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Reality TV
This group leans heavily to the feminine side, with high concentrations of clerical workers and homemakers, and better-than-par representation in the professional ranks.
35.9%: Male
64.1%: Female
42.4: Age
$62,740: Income
29.6%: Professional/Managerial (1)
12.9%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
12.1%: Retired (2)
6.9%: Student, High School or College (4)
6.3%: Homemaker (7)
5.9%: Unemployed 5)
4.7%: Business Owner (6)
4.0%: Salesperson (8)
4.0%: Disabled (9)
3.4%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
0.7%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Movies
As we’ve reported countless times throughout our dissections of Prosper Research and Analytics data, the Movies audience includes almost everybody, usually making it a rehashing of 18+ statistics. Nowhere have we seen that trend more clearly than in this chart, which regurgitates the occupation rankings to perfection with only minor differences in the percentages. If anything sticks out, it’s a slightly below-par annual household income.
48.5%: Male
51.5%: Female
44.5: Age
$62,051: Income
28.1%: Professional/Managerial (1)
15.6%: Retired (2)
11.1%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
7.5%: Student, High School or College (4)
6.5%: Unemployed 5)
4.9%: Business Owner (6)
4.1%: Homemaker (7)
4.0%: Salesperson (8)
4.0%: Disabled (9)
3.7%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
0.9%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Sitcoms
This audience is on the large side, and almost nails 18+ order in its career distribution. It skews to the high side of the center in the professional/managerial category, and to the load side among both the younger side of the list – students, and the older side – the retired.
48.8%: Male
52.2%: Female
44.9: Age
$65,914: Income
31.6%: Professional/Managerial (1)
14.3%: Retired (2)
12.2%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
6.4%: Student, High School or College (4)
6.0%: Unemployed 5)
4.9%: Business Owner (6)
4.1%: Homemaker (7)
4.0%: Disabled (9)
3.9%: Salesperson (8)
3.1%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
0.8%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Cooking Shows
The female lean of this audience group ties it with another genre with a similar gender breakdown – Reality TV – so it is likely no coincidence that the two are tied as having the most Clerical/Service workers in the audience. It also skews high for professional people and homemakers. Factory/labor workers aren’t well represented here.
37.6%: Male
62.4%: Female
45.0: Age $64,663: Income
32.1%: Professional/Managerial (1)
13.7%: Retired (2)
12.9%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
5.9%: Student, High School or College (4)
5.9%: Unemployed 5)
5.1%: Business Owner (6)
5.0%: Homemaker (7)
3.7%: Salesperson (8)
3.5%: Disabled (9)
2.7%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
0.8%: Military (11) Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Documentaries
This audience is the first one with a near-par proportion of retired and disabled people, and in fact, it skews high in the latter category. It pulls audience among the military as well. It’s below par among professionals and students.
57.8%: Male
42.2%: Female
45.8: Age
$63,284: Income
26.3%: Professional/Managerial (1)
16.9%: Retired (2)
9.3%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
6.9%: Business Owner (6)
6.8%: Unemployed 5)
5.4%: Student, High School or College (4)
4.5%: Disabled (9)
4.4%: Homemaker (7)
4.1%: Salesperson (8)
4.3%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
1.2%: Military (11) Source: Prosper Research and Analytics
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Sports
Here it is – your television source for men and the highest earning audience group of the 18 in the study. There are more women in the Sports TV audience than in Sports Radio. It skews high for a number of occupations, including professional, business owners and factory/labor. Not many homemakers in this group.
68.3%: Male
31.7%: Female
46.6: Age
$69,310: Income
30.0%: Professional/Managerial (1)
18.0%: Retired (2)
8.7%: Clerical/Service Worker (3)
6.2%: Business Owner (6)
6.0%: Unemployed 5)
5.7%: Student, High School or College (4)
4.8%: Factory Worker/Laborer/Driver (10)
4.4%: Salesperson (8)
3.7%: Disabled (9)
2.2%: Homemaker (7)
1.0%: Military (11)
Source: Prosper Research and Analytics