Here’s The Best Ammo Against Facebook For Your Stations

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By Adam R Jacobson
RBR + TVBR


NEW YORK, N.Y. – On Wednesday, I had the pleasure of attending Radio’s Financial Summit: Forecast 2017 at the regal Harvard Club in Midtown Manhattan.

We heard a lot of great things about the radio industry.

Borrell Associates CEO Gordon Borrell shared some not-so-great things about the radio industry.

As there is a no-reporting policy for this conference, I can’t go into detail on what he said. Visit Radio INK for details.

But, you won’t need them. Borrell’s message, repeated over and over, is that digital is going to benefit from weaker traditional media budgets.

Digital. Digital. Digital.

That being said, there are only truly two beneficiaries of the digital dollars in the U.S. – Google and Facebook.

And, Borrell believes Facebook will be the key recipient of these dollars that were going from “weaker” traditional media budgets.

What’s “weaker”?

It could be your stations, based on a recent CMO Council study that puts radio as one of the “least critical” channels to achieving successful business outcomes.

That’s right: Only Out-of-Home ranks lower among marketing decision-makers than radio.

OOH, indeed.

Luckily for radio, some much needed ammunition landed in my inbox just as Borrell was addressing attendees in a room that could pass for the main dining hall at Hogwarts, with words that could have been as gloomy as a notification that Death Eaters were right outside the door.

Facebook is no Death Eater to advertisers.

Rather, it’s a liar and a discredited advertising tool, and your sales team should be telling this to every client you have.

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Adam R Jacobson is a veteran radio industry journalist and advertising industry analyst with general, multicultural and Hispanic market expertise. From 1996 to 2006 he served as an editor at Radio & Records.