WGA issues analysis of AMPTP offer

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As day seven of renewed talks between WGA and AMPTP drag on this Thursday, WGA Chair/Negotiating Committee John Bowman sent an email to members on 12/4, addressing many of the rumors and misinformation out there regarding the strike:


December 4, 2007
Fellow Guild Members:
Rumors, half-truths, and misinformation about what is actually happening at the bargaining table fly across the internet, are posted on blogs, passed across picket lines like a game of telephone, and appear in stories and advertisements in the trade papers.
So, to clarify exactly where we are, we have prepared a report and analysis, which | you can read in its entirety here |.

In the meantime, here’s a brief summary:
The latest WGA proposal would cost the companies 151 million over three years. It is reasonable, serious, and easily affordable. For instance, it would cost Sony only 1.68 million per year. Paramount and CBS would each pay only 4.66 million per year. MGM would pay only 320,000 per year.

The AMPTP claims its proposal would give us 130 million over three years. Our analysis – and again, please visit the website to see for yourself – tells us their offer is worth only 32 million. But if you factor in the companies’ regressive proposal on “promotional use” (streaming TV shows and feature films in their entirety for free) writers could potentially lose 100 million in income over the course of this contract.

So while we don’t see how their proposal adds up to anywhere near 130 million, we greet their public willingness to make such an offer with real interest. If the AMPTP is serious about this figure, the WGA is confident we are closer to a deal than anyone has suggested, and we are hopeful that the companies will respond positively to our proposal, which is a serious, reasonable, and affordable attempt to bridge the gap between us.


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Carl has been with RBR-TVBR since 1997 and is currently Managing Director/Senior Editor. Residing in Northern Virginia, he covers the business of broadcasting, advertising, programming, new media and engineering. He’s also done a great deal of interviews for the company and handles our ever-growing stable of bylined columnists.