HFS Radio to move frequency in Baltimore

0

HFSCBS Radio Baltimore announced that Alternative HFS Radio, currently broadcasting at W248AO Baltimore on 97.5 FM, will move to a new frequency– W285EJ 104.9 FM White Marsh/Towson, MD–on Tuesday, 4/1 at 6:00AM. The change is a result of an agreement with the owner/licensee of the frequencies, Hope Christian Church of Marlton, NJ.


In addition to being heard on-air, HFS Radio will be streaming online at http://www.HFSRadio.com as well as the Radio.com app for mobile devices. The station will also be available on HD Radio devices at WWMX-FM 106.5 HD2 Baltimore. There is no word on what will replace the WHFS format on 97.5.

Said Robert Philips, Senior Vice President and Market Manager of CBS Radio  Baltimore: “Over the years, HFS has achieved a well-deserved reputation for debuting new artists, both national and local, as well as playing the best alternative music in Baltimore, and we are glad to be able to continue to do that on this new frequency.”

The on-air personality line-up on the station remains unchanged: veteran personality Neci is heard from 6am-10am, followed by Gina Crash, 10am-3pm. Spam broadcasts from 3pm-7pm, followed by Reada, 7pm-10pm. All of the special HFS programming features, such as “HFS Locals Only” and “Fresh Baked” will still be heard.

CBS Radio currently programs W248AO and W291BA (106.1) Baltimore as part of an arrangement with Hope Christian that it to air on its other Baltimore area translators via CBS’s 101.9 WLIF-HD4 Baltimore.

The actual WHFS calls are now sports talk in Tampa, owned by CBS Radio.

RBR-TVBR observation: The WHFS calls are legendary in the DC area. It was a progressive/free-form commercial station owned by Jake Einstein that started in the late 60’s on 102.3 and then moved to 99.1 in the area in the early 80’s. CBS Radio bought the station in 1996 and flipped it to Alternative. The ratings went down right after that. It was an awesome station when owned by Einstein. If only commercial radio could recreate what they had there today across the country—so many problems would be solved with folks flocking to Pandora for music discovery. Don’t get us wrong–HFS Radio isn’t bad–Alternative leaning Indie–but WHFS in its day was an unpredictable, DJ-curated musical adventure. It was just plain magic.